The NCAA can have very questionable rules at times. Sometimes these rules either don’t make logical sense, or are not described in the proper context. Eastern Michigan offensive lineman Dan Samuelson sounded off on a particular NCAA rule that forbid him from traveling with the Eagles to their bowl game in the Bahamas. Here is the Facebook response by Samuelson shared by his former teammate, Michigan TE Jake Butt:

The NCAA rule from their official website states:

Academic year in residence: Under the basic transfer regulations, you must spend an academic year in residence at the school to which you are transferring. If you transfer from a four-year college to an NCAA school, you must complete one academic year in residence at the new school before you can play for or receive travel expenses from the new school, unless you qualify for a transfer exception or waiver. To satisfy an academic year in residence, you must be enrolled in and successfully complete a full-time program of studies for two-full semesters or three-full quarters. Summer school terms and part-time enrollment do not count toward fulfilling an academic year in residence.

Transfer trigger: A condition that affects your transfer status. A transfer student is a student who transfers from a collegiate institution after having triggered any of the conditions:

Enrolled full-time during any term and attended class or in Division I if you are enrolled full time and are on campus on the opening day of classes.
Reported for a regular squad practice.
Practiced or competed while enrolled less than full-time.
Received institutional financial aid while attending summer school.